90s and 2000s rappers

It’s scary to be vulnerable, but I believe it’s necessary to get to the root of your artistry. Singing your own songs in front of people is one of the most vulnerable things you can do, and embodying what makes your songs and your stories unique will light up your art. Don’t be afraid to make others uncomfortable, because once you start creating art you don’t believe in, simply to please others and their needs, you will lose yourself.

Last of all, a book for those of us who may have started off home-recording and producing, without taking the time to learn an instrument or music theory. Hewitt lays out a vast array of the basics of musicianship and theory (the circle of fifths, for example) in a way that will make sense to anyone who entered music via DJing, sound recording, or just playing around and doing it themselves. Many of his examples are based around the familiar DAW piano roll, so they will be highly applicable to those who don’t have experience with traditional notation and sheet music.

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National endowment for the humanities

Sometimes, I’ll mention “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” and someone in the room will just start singing the chorus immediately. Part of that has to do with this melodic context stuff and the tonal hierarchy of certain notes that dominate that section, but it also has to do with other stuff like lyrical repetition in the chorus, tonal resolution, the rhythm and meter, and even with personal memories we might attribute to that song. Cognitive science can explain a portion of this, but not all of it, as Cui is sure to mention.

It absolutely could make “lazy” DJs better selectors, however, that is not our focus. We want to help people become better listeners and help them identify and understand the music they actually love, so they can confidently find more of it.

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